beach huts, gardens and a wee bit of free-motion quilting

This is less of a tutorial than a nudge to give free-motion machine sewing a go – whether it is embroidery, applique or quilting. If you are like me, you may have put off dropping your feed dogs and going for it, and I am here to tell you it is easier than you might think. All you need is a sewing machine that allows you to drop the feed dogs (usually a switch at the back of the machine’s table somewhere) and although not absolutely necessary, I do prefer to use a darning foot. I have heard of people taping thin card over the feed dogs if they cannot be dropped.

11 may 2014 - 03
using a darning foot

Most of the feet for my machine are changed by pushing the release at the back of the foot and reattach just by pushing them back on, but I think a lot of darning feet are like the one in the photo and you have to undo the screw at the side…I am embarrassed to admit that took my a little while to work out! You can free-motion sew without a foot at all, but please do watch your fingers as there is nothing to stop you stitching through more than just the fabric.

To stop the fabric getting out of shape as you sew you either need to hold it firm with an embroidery hoop or – as my lovely friend Karen pointed out to me – you can use a fabric stabiliser. I use stitch-and-tear, which I iron on to the back of the fabric. It gives you more to sew through and you can tear it away when you have finished. You can also get stabilisers that wash away.

I suggest setting up your sewing machine, ironing some stabiliser to a scrap of fabric and just having a play. I was really surprised how quickly I started to get the hang of it.

I find I end up sewing over my starting thread and the criss-cross stitches hold the thread in place, so it is not necessary to pull the thread tail through to the back and tie it or anything – just trim it close. If you are writing with the machine or sewing discrete areas with the same colour thread, just raise the needle and the foot and pull the fabric away from you to give yourself a loop of thread, so it doesn’t pull when you go on to the next bit of stitching. You can trim all the loops at the end – it saves time, rather than trimming each bit before you move on.

11 may 2014 - 01
loose ends before trimming

Free-motion applique is a really quick and easy way to applique. It leaves a raw edge to the fabric pieces, but I rather like that effect. You can either cut a shape and sew around the edges or use a piece of fabric, sew your outline and then trim away excess fabric. I usually use the first way, as I like to get an idea of how the finished piece will look, but the second way may be a little quicker. (One little hint: if your sewn line goes a bit wobbly, just sew over it again as somehow two slightly wobbly lines together look like they are meant to be like that). You could pin or tack applique pieces in place, but I find it far easier to use a fabric glue stick. They are designed to be suitable to sew through without getting your needle all gummed up.

11 may 2014 - 51
finished beach-hut cards
garden card
garden card

I am now practiced at changing to and from the darning foot (and keep a small Phillips screwdriver in my sewing kit), but still find myself choosing to do all my free-motion projects at the same time rather than switching between feet too often. Today, I decided to do a little (very basic) free-motion quilting, making an ivory satin dolly bag.

11 may 2014 - 20
little bag of love
11 may 2014 - 18
cone flower and bee quilting
11 may 2014 - 06
love
11 may 2014 - 04
happiness and marriage

 

 

I had thought I might do some gardening today rather than sewing, but the sunshine kept making way for Spring showers. However late afternoon, the lure of sunshine in the garden was too much for me.

11 may 2014 - 09
first clematis flower of the year
11 may 2014 - 29
I have a love hate relationship with dandelions
11 may 2014 - 24
the wisteria is the best I have ever seen it
11 may 2014 - 22
the garden
11 may 2014 - 17
the azalea my mum gave us as a low-calorie alternative to a chocolate Easter egg
11 may 2014 - 27
bleeding heart and little white alliums
11 may 2014 - 46
aquilegia in the shade of the cherry tree
11 may 2014 - 40
poppies adding a splash of colour
11 may 2014 - 21
poppies like drops of sunshine

Before I go (sorry but Philadelphia is on tv and I am a big fan of Denzel Washington!) I just have a special photo I would like to share – especially for Shellie and Christina! šŸ˜‰

man and cat in perfect harmony
man and cat in perfect harmony

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “beach huts, gardens and a wee bit of free-motion quilting

  1. Irene May 12, 2014 / 07:36

    I read the first sentence and thought (the coward that I am…) “phew! I can’t drop my feed dogs, so I will be excused”. And then I read on… . And as I think that the cards (especially the beach hut ones) are absolutely gorgeous, I really might give the thin cardbord thing a try. One day, when I feel especially courageous, that is.

    …and I STILL think that dandelions should not be pronounced “dandy lions”! šŸ™‚

    • deereyme May 12, 2014 / 07:57

      Free-motion sewing really is fun to do!

      My problem is that since our discussion on the pronunciation of dandelions, I keep wanting to spell it dandylions! Thank goodness for automatic spellcheck.

  2. Simone May 15, 2014 / 05:54

    The cards are lovely Sue, I might just have to resurrect my sewing machine and have a play. Used to sew pages when I scrapbooked but not for a long long time. Haven’t tried the free motion way either.

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